Continued Tale of Two Ancient Cities

Segesta, as previously discussed in the blog of conflict with Selinunte, was also a site with a history dating back to last millennium BC. Legend, and assumed factual by some historians, is that the founders were surviving Trojans who fled after their historic defeat. The city is referred to in this context by a number of Ancient Greek poets.

.

All that remains is a beautiful temple that is one o& the most intact of this architecture in the world. Despite its relative completeness it was never finished as it lacks the ornamental trimmings of a completed work. But it is spectacular to behold in a relatively remote but pastoral setting.

The reason for not being complete is still a mystery. Some say it lack funds due to continuous wars with Selinunte. Others say it was quickly started as a tribute to Athens in anticipation o& their support against that same enemy.

In its continued battles, and ultimate defeat, of its neighbour Selinunte Segesta remained a viable city into 1st century AD. But although it survived, it was often subjected to severe events over the centuries. It’s most devastating was at the hands of the Hannibal, and a troop of various soldiers including North African city of Carthridge, having landed in the West of Sicily on his return put the whole of the citizens (said to amount to 10,000 in number) to the sword, plundered their wealth, and sold the women and children into slavery.

The city rose again to some prominence under the Romans given the status of Trojan heritage.

Romans belief and acceptance of Trojan history gave the city special rights even into the first century AD – despite some alliances with the Carthageans during the Punic Wars.

“sine foedere immunes ac liberi”- a free and immune city.

Close by is also the remains of well preserved Greek type theatre which is open, allowing you to test the acoustics as you walk down to your seat to enjoy a goblet of wine before the play begins,

Advertisements

2 Comments Add yours

  1. Chris perry says:

    Hi Scott and Fil I am enjoying your posts, and the history lessons, but I had to laugh at your slip of a finger on the keyboard between the b and the n, I know you meant punic wars! but the pubic wars were also a historic event of sorts, between playboy and penthouse magazines in the 60s and 70s as each magazine tried to outdo the other in how risque their photos were.
    any way it looks like your both having a great time, and not to rub it in but see you soon!

    1. Well those Romans were pretty risky also😚. Tks for seeing the post and finding the “fat finger” error. Ciao.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s